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  What's New @ IEEE-USA - Eye On Washington


Vol. 2005, No. 15 (29July 2005)


This newsletter includes:

1) CAPITOL HILL WATCH

  • DEBATE OVER GROKSTER DECISION CONTINUES WITH FORUM SPONSORED BY CONGRESSIONAL INTERNET CAUCUS
  • HOUSE SPONSOR GIVES UP TRYING TO PLEASE PATENT BILL INTEREST GROUPS
  • HOUSE SCIENCE HEARING: INNOVATION MUST BE PRIORITY OR U.S. WILL CEDE ITS POSITION AS GLOBAL LEADER
  • SENATE HEALTH COMMITTEE APPROVES BILL TO INCREASE USE OF TECHNOLOGY TO STORE PATIENT INFORMATION
  • ROHRABACHER UNHAPPY WITH BUSINESSES WHO SEND JOBS OVERSEAS
  • HOUSE URGES NHTSA TO CREATE STRONGER C.A.F.E. STANDARDS
  • HOUSE PASSED NASA AUTHORIZATION BILL
  • MSPs FARE NOT-SO-WELL WITH SENATE APPROPRIATORS
  • ENERGY POLICY ACT of 2005 PROMOTES INVESTMENT, RELIABILITY AND SECURITY, BUT FAILS TO CONFRONT ISSUES OF GREATEST CONCERN (By IEEE-USA Summer Intern Patrick E. Meyer)
  • NEW LEGISLATION OF INTEREST

2) WHITE HOUSE & EXECUTIVE AGENCY WATCH

  • WHITE HOUSE ANNOUNCES FY 07 R&D BUDGET PRIORITIES

3) REPORTS, SPEECHES & DOCUMENTS OF NOTE

  • NEW GAO REPORTS
  • FCC RELEASES DATA ON INTERNET ACCESS: CONNECTIONS UP 34 PERCENT IN 2004
  • US HOSPITALS WITH HEALTHY IT MAY HAVE LOWER MORTALITY RATES
  • DOD ANNOUNCES 10-YEAR HOMELAND DEFENSE STRATEGY
  • NEW REPORT BY NBRE SAYS U.S. LOSING SCIENCE & ENGINEERING GRADS

4) U.S. COURTS ACTIVITY

5) AWARDS & GRANTS

6) CONFERENCES, FELLOWSHIPS, PROGRAMS & INTERNSHIPS FOR ENGINEERS, and STUDENTS and SCHOLARS OF ENGINEERING

7) U.S. STATES WATCH

  • TEXAS PUTTING YET MORE MONEY INTO SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY and IEEE-USA NOMINATION TO NEW EMERGING TECH COMMITTEE

8) LATEST IEEE-USA ACTIVITIES

  • NEW RESOURCE PAGE ON EHealth
  • NEW! TRACK IEEE-USA's PROGRESS
  • IEEE-USA & IEEE COMPUTER SOCIETY SPONSOR FORUM ON CYBERSECURITY
  • 2005 IEEE-USA WISE INTERNS

9) OTHER ITEMS OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

  • INDIAN PRIME MINISTER SPEAKS TO CONGRESS: EXCERPTS FROM AN ONLINE REPORT

1) CAPITOL HILL WATCH

  • DEBATE OVER GROKSTER DECISION CONTINUES WITH FORUM SPONSORED BY CONGRESSIONAL INTERNET CAUCUS

 

19 JULY: Andrew Greenberg, Chair of the IEEE-USA Intellectual Property Committee, participated in a forum to discuss the recent Supreme Court decision in Grokster V. MGM. The forum was sponsored by the Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee. The other panelists were Donald Verrilli, representing MGM and the entertainment industry and a partner at Jenner & Block, and Fred von Lohmann, an Electronic Frontier Foundation staff attorney who defended Grokster — the makers of the file-sharing software program.

Lohmann stressed that Congress should repeal the laws that let copyright owners recover some kinds of damages in the absence of clear rules outlining when companies are guilty of encouraging copyright infringement. "If we can't get certainty about what the rules are, at least we should make it such that companies that guess wrong aren't completely wiped out."

"We shouldn't have a legal system where if Microsoft, Apple or Sling bet wrong, they go out of business." Instead, he said, copyright owners in legal disputes over products would retain the right to ask judges to stop tech manufacturers from making, selling and marketing their products. They also could continue to obtain actual damages, he added.

In MGM v. Grokster, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled that makers of products that actively encourage people to induce copyrights could be held liable and that copyright owners can sue tech manufacturers. The justices said inducement could be deduced from statements and a trail of evidence, as well as a failure to take steps to prevent copyright infringement in their products. But the high court disagreed on other legal doctrines regarding how such manufacturers could be held liable absent such a trail of evidence.

Corporate law firms predict more litigation and legal uncertainty for innovative technology companies in the wake of the ruling. Verrilli said that the Supreme Court struck the correct balance and that Congress needs to take no action. Greenberg said Congress should monitor subsequent developments to ensure that the threat of litigation is not preventing small tech startups from obtaining funding from worried venture capitalists.

  • HOUSE SPONSOR GIVES UP TRYING TO PLEASE PATENT BILL INTEREST GROUPS

26 JULY: Months of negotiations between technology and pharmaceutical industries failed to produce a compromise on patent law changes. Thus, Congressman Lamar Smith (R-Tex.), chairman of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet and Intellectual Property, will proceed without them, disappointing all concerned. Smith has created his own draft bill (HR 2795) that contains little to please the industries that lobbied for changes to patent law, but, he says, his bill is a, "holistic approach to patent reform."

Proposals for overhauling the patent system have pitted technology companies against the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Technology companies are pressing to weaken patent laws that they blame for contributing to a rising tide of infringement litigation, while drug companies want to protect a system they rely on to stave off competition. Technology companies contend an epidemic of infringement suits forces them to pay unwarranted licensing fees to patent holders. Missing from Smith's draft is a provision the technology industry sought that would allow judges to award monetary damages — instead of imposing injunctions — after finding in favor of patent holders in infringement cases.

The Subcommittee may be mark up the bill as early as July 29, which means, the bill is subject to change at any point between now and when it lands on the President's desk.

  • HOUSE SCIENCE HEARING: INNOVATION MUST BE PRIORITY OR U.S. WILL CEDE ITS POSITION AS GLOBAL LEADER

Witnesses testifying at a House Science Committee hearing — US Competitiveness:The Innovation Challenge last week warned that the changing dynamics of the global economy are threatening America's economic position and innovation is crucial to the nation's future economic growth.

Nicholas Donofrio, Executive Vice President for Innovation and Technology at IBM; John Morgridge, Chairman of the Board at Cisco Systems; and Dr. William Brody, President of The Johns Hopkins University told Congress the nation's position as the global economic leader is being aggressively challenged by other nations. To strengthen the nation's economic position, they said that innovation must receive greater attention as a national priority and they urged a greater focus on education and robust investments in research and development (R&D).  Brody and Morgridge also called for increased funding for the National Science Foundation (NSF).

"The reason for this hearing should be clear; we want to send a message; if we don't invest today in science, technology, and education then our economy simply will not continue to thrive," said Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY). "Happily, we have some key allies in Congress in promoting this message such as Chairman Frank Wolf (R-VA) and his fellow appropriator John Culberson (R-TX).  But we have more work to do to ensure that all of Washington understands what's at stake."

Environment, Technology, and Standards Subcommittee Chairman Vernon Ehlers (R-MI) said, "The United States is on the cutting edge of global competition because of our past investments in science and technology. Whether we remain in that position depends on how well we understand the drivers of innovation and how we choose to respond."

Boehlert noted that he, Chairman Wolf and Chairman Ehlers are organizing an Innovation Summit to be held this fall that will bring together leaders in business and academia to discuss the nation's innovation challenges and help chart a course for the future.

IEEE-USA staffer Vin O'Neill created a summary of the hearing and the recommendations of each witness that you may view at http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/reports/InnovationHearing0705.pdf.

Volunteer leaders and staff from IEEE-USA's R&D Policy Committee and Career & Workforce Policy Committee are preparing a detailed statement describing IEEE-USA's perspectives on essential links between research and development policies, the science and engineering workforce and innovation and technological competitiveness for inclusion in the hearings record.

  • SENATE HEALTH COMMITTEE APPROVES BILL TO INCREASE USE OF TECHNOLOGY TO STORE PATIENT INFORMATION

The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee approved the bipartisan Wired for Health Care Quality Act (S. 1418) designed to increase the use of technology to store and share medical information and make it available quickly. The bill also contains language to ensure patient privacy. S. 1418 combines elements of two similar bills: S. 1262 by Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) and Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.), and S. 1355 by HELP Chairman Michael B. Enzi (R-Wyo.) and Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts (D-Mass.).

"All of us believe that if we move from a paper-based health care system to secure electronic medical records, we will reduce mistakes, save lives, save time and save money," Enzi said. David Brailer, President Bush's national coordinator of health information technology, estimates the technology could reduce health care costs by $140 billion a year.

The legislation includes provisions that:

— establish an Office of the National Coordinator of Health Information Technology within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS),
 

— require the HHS secretary to establish the public-private American Health Information Collaborative to make recommendations on setting national policies for supporting the widespread adoption of health information technology,
 

— require federal agencies that collect health data to comply with such standards within three years after the policies are approved,
 

— prohibit federal funds to be spent on technology not consistent with the standards,
 

— authorize competitive grants to hospitals, group practices and other health care providers that would facilitate distribution of health information electronically among health care providers,
 

— authorize HHS to award demonstration grants to health education centers to integrate health information technology systems in the clinical education of health professionals,
 

require the establishment of a Health Information Technology Resource Center to provide technical assistance to states and health care providers to implement health data technology, and
 

clarify that Health Information Technology Resource Center privacy rules apply to any health information stored or transmitted electronically.

  • ROHRABACHER UNHAPPY WITH BUSINESSES WHO SEND JOBS OVERSEAS

 

21 JULY: Nicholas Donofrio is Senior Vice President for Technology and Manufacturing at IBM Corporation, John Morgridge Chairman of Cisco Systems, Incorporated, and part-time professor at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business, and Dr. William Brody, President of The Johns Hopkins University testified on U.S. competitiveness before the House Science Committee on the subject of U.S. economic competitiveness and its relationship to federal investments in research and education programs in the fields of science and engineering.

Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) for whom 2005 IEEE-USA Fellow Randy Brouwer is working stressed his interest in protecting the wellness of the American people by grilling the IBM and Cisco representatives about the jobs, R&D and investments that each company sends overseas. Rohrabacher pointed out that he represents Americans, "We don't represent a global interest especially if that global interest puts Americans out of work."  Listen to the archived web cast at http://www.house.gov/science/webcast/index.htm

And speaking of Congressman Rohrabacher, IEEE-USA President Gerard Alphonse presented him with the IEEE-USA Distinguished Public Service Award on 12 July.  View photos at http://ieeeusa.com/communications/notable/award-07-12-05.asp.

  • HOUSE URGES NHTSA TO CREATE STRONGER C.A.F.E. STANDARDS

In anticipation of an upcoming proposal to restructure the way in which Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards are calculated, a bipartisan group of House Members, led by Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY) and Ed Markey (D-Mass.), a senior Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, wrote a letter to Dr. Jeffrey Runge, Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), urging him to "significantly increase fuel economy standards in its upcoming rulemaking process." Noting that the nation's dependence on oil puts America's national security, economy and environment at serious risk, the Members called upon NHTSA to take serious steps to reduce U.S. reliance on foreign oil by aggressively addressing the efficiency of the nation's automotive fleet, which is largest consumer of oil. NHTSA is considering fundamental changes to the way in which the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards (CAFÉ) program is structured including basing fuel economy standards on size or weight, rather than having one standard for all light trucks. 

 

In their letter to Dr. Runge, the Members argued that any change in the CAFE program "should significantly increase the overall fuel economy of the fleet and improve safety" regardless of the future mix of vehicles in the fleet. The Members also said that any restructuring of the program "must not allow overall fuel economy or safety to be undermined," and that "any new program should provide automakers incentives to use technological innovations to improve efficiency and safety."

 

The letter laid out three principles as follows:

 

"Principle 1.  Increase overall fuel economy and safety — The biggest single step we can take to reduce America's oil dependence, save consumer money at the gas pump, and curb greenhouse gas emissions is to require all new vehicles to go farther on a gallon of gas."

 

"Principle 2.  Do not allow overall fuel economy or safety to be undermined - We have serious concerns regarding the agency's consideration of fundamental changes to the structure of the CAFE program, such as basing standards on weight.  If NHTSA does propose an attribute-based standard, it must either be aggressive enough to prevent a decrease in fuel economy regardless of the future mix of vehicles in the fleet, or contain some other mechanism to prevent backsliding of overall average fuel economy and vehicle safety."

 

"Principle 3.  Encourage technology innovation to improve fuel economy and safety — Any policy should provide an incentive for automakers to develop and use technology, such as high-strength lightweight materials, to improve fuel economy and safety.  These materials, along with hybrids and the technologies identified by the NAS, show great promise for improving fuel economy without reducing safety.

  • HOUSE PASSED NASA AUTHORIZATION BILL

By an overwhelming margin, the House passed legislation to reauthorize the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). H.R. 3070, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2005, was adopted by of vote of 383 to 15. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-TX) praised the bill's passage saying, "The Science Committee has brought forth a comprehensive bill that continues NASA's vital work by implementing and filling in the details of the president's bold vision for space exploration.  I thank Chairman Boehlert, Representative Calvert, as well as their committee for their hard work on helping NASA make that next 'giant leap for mankind.'"

H.R. 3070 endorses the President's Vision for Space Exploration; endorses the return of humans to the Moon by 2020; ensures NASA's missions in space science, Earth science and aeronautics remain healthy and robust; endorses a Shuttle servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope; establishes an awards program to encourage the private sector to develop creative solutions to NASA's technical challenges; allows NASA to proceed with its plan to retire the Space Shuttle fleet by the end of 2010; and encourages NASA to launch the Crew Exploration Vehicle (the Shuttle's replacement) as close to 2010 as possible.

  • MSPs FARE NOT-SO-WELL WITH SENATE APPROPRIATORS

In marking up the FY 2006 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations bill the week of 11 July, Senate appropriators were not as generous to the Education Department's Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program as their counterparts in the House. The Senate version of the bill (H.R. 3010), provides $178.6 million for the MSP program, equal to the FY 2005 funding level. The House version of the bill recommended $190.0 million, an increase of 6.4 percent. The Administration had requested $269.0 million in FY 2006 funding for MSP, but planned to set aside $120.0 million of this amount for a competitive grant program dedicated strictly to improving high school mathematics. In a repeat of last year's appropriations process, neither the House nor the Senate bill agreed to provide this requested set-aside for secondary mathematics. The full text of the committee report is available at http://thomas.loc.gov/home/approp/app06.html.

  • ENERGY POLICY ACT of 2005 PROMOTES INVESTMENT, RELIABILITY AND SECURITY, BUT FAILS TO CONFRONT ISSUES OF GREATEST CONCERN (By IEEE-USA Summer Intern Patrick E. Meyer)

 

JULY 27:  Shortly after President Bush took office in 2001, he created an energy task force with the ultimate goal of increasing investment and reliability in, and ensuring the complete future security of the American energy sector. Now, 4 years and a presidential term later, the goals outlined by the President are finally solidifying. That is, if Jell-O can be considered solid.

In the early hours of Tuesday morning, House and Senate conferees agreed to pass — as Joe Barton (R-Tex.) proclaimed – “the most comprehensive energy bill put before the Congress in probably 30 or 40 years.” (Energy Policy Act of 2005, HR 6) But many agreements had to be made in order for the passing to even be conceivable. The first “compromise” took place during a rare Sunday conference, when House Republicans gave up on their argument that HR.6 include a liability shield for manufacturers of the fuel additive methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). With the issue of MTBE out of the way, the conferees were able to plow through the remaining subjects. However, instead of compromising, conferees completely dropped provisions on several key issues in order to come to House-Senate agreement. Senator Jeff Bingaman’s (D-N.M) controversial, Senate-approved, “renewable portfolio standard” — mandating that 10-percent of electricity sold by utilities be derived from renewable sources — is now completely absent from the final bill. The final bill also does not include mandates that would allow for reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, sidestepping a leading issue of increasing global concern. Furthermore, despite the House’s previous supportive stance, the bill does not include any provisions on the issue of oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR).

In addition to omitting language on renewables, greenhouse gasses and ANWR, the legislation does little to reduce U.S oil demand and imports. The most effective way to cut imports would have been to implement a requirement to increase automotive fuel-efficiency standards. However, due to strong negative pressure from the automotive industry, the House and Senate left out any such provisions.

You may be wondering: “what does the bill accomplish then?” Fortunately, HR.6. does accomplish a few noteworthy goals. The 1200-plus page bill encourages domestic production of energy resources and development of new technologies through research and development.  The bill includes extensive incentives for research into hydrogen fuel cells, alternative fuels such as ethanol, hybrid technologies, efficiency innovation, and wind, geothermal and solar development. The bill also includes measures to entice investment for construction of new nuclear power plants. Additionally, HR.6. will require utilities to meet federal reliability and interconnection standards for the electric transmission grid. It also provides loan guarantees for clean energy and nuclear technologies in addition to a $1.8 billion program to promote clean coal technologies.

The version approved by the House and the Senate conferees is timely, but does not yet include agreements on tax incentives. As of Tuesday night, tax writers were still attempting to resolve a few outstanding issues related to the included tax incentives. Prior to negotiations, the House HR.6. included tax incentives totaling $8 billion – while the Senate HR.6. included 14 billion.  It is estimated that the negotiated tax package will cost about $11.5 billion — a respectable compromise between the House and Senate — but still nearly double the White House’s call for a cost of $6.7 billion.

It is expected that the House will vote on the comprehensive HR.6., including the final value of tax incentives, by the end of Thursday. The Senate will most likely vote by Friday. If HR.6. makes it to the President’s desk before August recess, Congress deserves congratulation for passing the first comprehensive energy bill since 1992. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 will certainly promote investment, reliability and security. However, many are left feeling that the final version is “watered down” — that the controversial issues were simply left out of the final bill so as to pass the legislation in a timely manner.  Renewable portfolio standards, fuel efficiency requirements, greenhouse gas reductions, and drilling in ANWR are topics that need to be addressed. Let us hope that these issues don’t remain on the Capitol Hill backburner for another thirteen years.

  • NEW LEGISLATION OF INTEREST

13 JULY: Congressman Zach Wamp (R-Tenn.) introduced a bill (HR 3263) to reduce the growth of energy use in the United States, to limit the impact of growing energy use on the economy, environment, and national security of the United States through reductions in energy demand, and for other purposes. Congress finds that:

energy prices, especially the price of petroleum and natural gas, have soared over the last few years due to demand exceeding supply; and as both supply and demand are relatively inflexible, even small reductions in United States demand for natural gas and oil can result in significant reductions in gas and oil prices;
 

— energy consumption in the United States is projected by the Energy Information Administration to increase by 35,000,000,000,000,000 Btus over the next 2 decades, which is equivalent to twice the energy consumed by all the cars currently on the roads;
 

— by 2025, the Energy Information Administration projects that 80 percent of oil used in the United States will be imported; and overall energy imports are expected to increase by 75 percent in the United States;
 

— energy efficiency improvements since the 1970s have reduced current United States energy consumption by 40 percent, or 40,000,000,000,000,000 Btus, making energy efficiency the greatest energy resource of the United States; and
 

energy efficiency is generally the quickest, cheapest, and cleanest way to bring energy supply and demand in balance.


2) WHITE HOUSE & EXECUTIVE AGENCY WATCH

 

  • WHITE HOUSE ANNOUNCES FY 07 R&D BUDGET PRIORITIES

We're barely halfway to finishing a budget for FY 2006 and already the White House is laying out priorities for FY 2007, the budget that the President will present to Congress in just 7 months. On 8 July, Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Marburger and Office of Management and Budget Director Joshua Bolten laid out the Administration's research and development priorities for FY 2007. The guidance states that interagency R&D priorities should receive attention in agencies' budget requests. Among the highest priority inter-agency R&D initiatives are homeland security, high-end computing and net-working, National Nanotechnology Initiative, priorities in the physical sciences, understanding complex biological systems, and energy and the environment.

To improve investment decisions for and management of R&D programs, federal agencies must apply the following 3 criteria to all R&D programs: relevance; quality; and, performance. The Administration supports federal R&D which:

Advance fundamental scientific discovery to improve future quality of life;
 

Strengthen science, mathematics and engineering education;
 

Enable potentially high-payoff activities that require a federal presence to attain long-term national goals; Address societal and environmental impacts of science and technology;
 

Ensure a scientifically literate population and a supply of qualified technical personnel commensurate with national need;
 

Support technological innovation to spur economic growth and new job growth; and
 

Strengthen international partnerships that foster advancement of scientific frontiers.

The entire memo may be viewed at http://www.ostp.gov/html/budget/2007/ostp_omb_guidancememo_FY07.pdf


3) REPORTS, SPEECHES & DOCUMENTS OF NOTE

  • NEW GAO REPORTS

Aviation Security: Better Planning Needed to Optimize Deployment of Checked Baggage Screening Systems, Testimony by Cathleen A. Berrick, director, homeland security and justice, before the Subcommittee on Economic Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Cyber security., House Committee on Homeland Security

GAO-05-896T (13 July 2005) http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-896T

Highlights: http://www.gao.gov/highlights/d05896thigh.pdf

Commercial Aviation: Structural Costs Continue to Challenge Legacy Airlines' Financial Performance, Testimony by Jay Etta Z. Hecker, director, physical infrastructure, before the Subcommittee on Aviation, Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation

GAO-05-834T (13 July 2005) http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-834T

Highlights: http://www.gao.gov/highlights/d05834thigh.pdf

Workforce Investment Act: Substantial Funds Are Spent, But Little Is Known About Training Outcomes

GAO-05-650 (June 2005) http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05650.pdf

Highlights: http://www.gao.gov/highlights/d05650high.pdf

  • FCC RELEASES DATA ON INTERNET ACCESS: CONNECTIONS UP 34 PERCENT IN 2004

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has released a report showing data — as of 31 December 2004 — on high-speed connections to the Internet in the U.S.  In the report, the FCC shows data, filed by providers on FCC Form 477 in the FCC's local competition and broadband data gathering program, collected from providers with at least 250 high-speed lines in a state.

Twice a year, facilities-based broadband providers must report the number of high-speed connections in service pursuant to the FCC's local competition and broadband data gathering program. For reporting purposes, high-speed lines are connections that deliver services at speeds exceeding 200 kilobits per second (kbps) in at least one direction, while advanced services lines are connections that deliver services at speeds exceeding 200 kbps in both directions.

The report is available for reference in the FCC's Reference Information Center, Courtyard Level, 445 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC.  Copies may be purchased by calling Best Copy and Printing, Inc. at (800) 378-3160.  The report can also be downloaded from the FCC-State Link Internet site at www.fcc.gov/wcb/stats

  • US HOSPITALS WITH HEALTHY IT MAY HAVE LOWER MORTALITY RATES

According to results of a new study appearing in the July issue of Hospitals & Health Networks magazine the journal of the American Hospital Association (AHA) (The Quality Connection, By Alden Solovy) 100 U.S. hospitals that have invested significantly in health information technology have lower mortality rates than other hospitals. While the new survey does not establish a "cause and effect" relationship between information technology use and improved outcomes, it demonstrates that technology can play an important role in quality. The 2005 survey was conducted in cooperation with Accenture, IDX Systems Corporation and the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME). (Press Release)

  • DOD ANNOUNCES 10-YEAR HOMELAND DEFENSE STRATEGY

 

The Defense Department has released a 10-year strategy outlining sweeping goals and operational concepts under which the U.S. military will act in cyberspace, in space and, if necessary, within the domestic U.S, to protect our security. The 46-page report states, "The terrorist enemy now considers the U.S. homeland a pre-eminent part of the global theater of combat, and so must we." The strategy includes the following five key objectives:

 

The Strategy for Homeland Defense and Civil Support outlines a combination of capabilities to ensure homeland safety including development of advanced information and communications technology, new generations of sensors and non-lethal weapons. While not dismissing traditional military threats, the new Strategy states that the resources of the U.S. military will be deployed in homeland defense situations which exceed the capabilities of domestic law enforcement authorities. The entire document may be viewed at http://www.dod.gov/news/Jun2005/d20050630homeland.pdf

  • NEW REPORT BY NBRE SAYS U.S. LOSING SCIENCE & ENGINEERING GRADS

With increasing frequency, we are hearing that the U.S. is losing losing its innovative edge, losing its economic edge, and now losing our dominance in science and engineering as America's share of graduates in these fields falls relative to Europe, China and India. A new study, written by Richard Freeman at the National Bureau of Economic Research, warns that changes in the global science and engineering job market may require a long period of adjustment for U.S. workers.

Freeman says that moves by international companies to move information technology, high-tech manufacturing and research and development jobs to low-income developing countries were just "harbingers" of that longer-term adjustment. Urgent action is needed to ensure that slippage in science and engineering education and research did not undermine America's global economic leadership, he added.

Numbers of science and engineering graduates from European and Asian universities are soaring while new degrees in the United States have stagnated. In 2000, the paper said, 17 percent of university bachelor degrees in the U.S. were in science and engineering compared with a world average of 27 percent and 52 percent in China. The picture among doctorates key to advanced scientific research was more striking. In 2001, universities in the European Union granted 40 percent more science and engineering doctorates than the United States, with that figure expected to reach nearly 100 percent by about 2010, the study showed. The study said deteriorating opportunities and comparative wages for young science and engineering graduates has discouraged U.S. students from entering these fields, but not those born in other countries.

"Research and technological activity and production are moving where the people are, even when they are located in the low-wage South," Freeman wrote, citing a study saying some 10-15 percent of all U.S. jobs were "off-shorable."  Information on obtaining the report is at http://papers.nber.org/papers/w11457


4) U.S. COURTS ACTIVITY

No activity to report.


5) AWARDS & GRANTS

  • AAAS GRANT SITE

The American Association for the Advancement of Science has a new service called GrantsNet Express.  Each week GrantsNet will provide a listing of science funding opportunities from private foundations and organizations, and new U.S. government grant announcements in the sciences. AAAS will send GrantsNet by e-mail to AAAS member subscribers. The weekly emails will include:

New science funding programs, divided into opportunities for postdocs/graduate students and undergraduates

Submission deadlines for funding opportunities scheduled in the upcoming week

New listings of funding for science-related grant programs from U.S. government agencies

To register, visit http://www2.sciencecareers.org/promos/grantsubmit.asp

Examples include:

American Astronomical Society, Harlow Shapley Visiting Lectureships in Astronomy: http://www.grantsnet.org/search/pgm_info.cfm?pgm_id=323 Deadline: None

 

Intel Corporation, Intel Foundation Community Grants:

http://www.grantsnet.org/search/pgm_info.cfm?pgm_id=145 Deadline: None

 

Society of Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR), SCAR Grant Program for Radiology Informatics Research

http://www.grantsnet.org/search/pgm_info.cfm?pgm_id=3336 Deadline: 1 August 2005

  • EDA 2005 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AWARDS

 

The Economic Development Administration (EDA) has announced it is accepting nominations for the Excellence in Economic Development Awards 2005. The Awards, which annually showcase best practices and highlight outstanding results, are presented for excellence in economic development across seven categories:

  • Technology-led for supporting technology-led economic development and reflecting the important role of linking universities and industry and technology transfer.
  • Regional Competitiveness — for enhancing regional competitiveness and supporting long-term development of the regional economy.
  • Urban or Suburban — for utilizing innovative, market-based strategies to improve urban or suburban economic development results.
  • Rural — for utilizing innovative, market-based strategies to improve rural economic development results.
  • Economic Adjustment Strategies — for helping communities plan and implement economic adjustment strategies in response to sudden and severe economic dislocations.
  • Community and Faith-based Social Entrepreneurship — for advancing community and faith-based social entrepreneurship in redevelopment strategies for areas of chronic economic distress.
  • Innovation — for incorporating innovative strategies that achieve maximum results.

The top three nominees in each category advance as finalists. Award recipients receive a commemorative award and are invited to highlight their strategies at EDA's "Symposium for 21st Century Economic Development," to be held 22 September 2005, at the Ritz-Carlton Pentagon City in Arlington, Va.

Eligible nominees include colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, and local, state and regional government entities. Nominated investments may be specific projects of national importance or the cumulative activities of the nominee. Either an organization or individual may submit a nomination. Nominations are due by 12 August 2005. To view selection criteria or obtain a nomination form, visit: http://www.eda.gov/NewsEvents/ExcellenceAwards.xml

  • DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Research in satellite oceanography. Program priorities include research in ocean color, sea ice, ocean vector winds, sea surface height, sea surface temperature, and sea surface roughness. Approximately $375,000 is expected to be available annually for awards. Proposals are due 23 September 2005. For more information, visit: http://www.fedgrants.gov/Applicants/DOC/NOAA/GMC/NESDIS-NESDISPO-2006-2000342/listing.html

 

Research in primary vicarious calibration of ocean color satellite sensors. The goal of this program is to produce a continuous, climate-quality time-series of normalized water-leaving spectral radiances across multiple agency missions and ocean color satellite sensors. Up to $1.1 million is expected to be available annually, for up to two years, for awards. Proposals are due 1 September 2005. For more information, visit: http://www.fedgrants.gov/Applicants/DOC/NOAA/GMC/NESDIS-NESDISPO-2006-2000339/listing.html

  • DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is seeking sources capable of developing technologies that could lead to the reduction of crew size requirements for future and current aircraft carrier design. Technologies that could be incorporated into ship design within the next 10 years are sought; however, DARPA will consider those matured up to the year 2030. Eligible are all capable and qualified sources. No awards are anticipated for responses, which are due 1 August 2005. More information is available at: http://www2.eps.gov/spg/ODA/DARPA/CMO/Reference%2DNumber%2DSS05%2D30/listing.html

 

DARPA is soliciting proposals for investigations of alternatives to standard analog-to-digital converter (ADC) technology implementing the usual quantized Shannon representation (i.e. uniform discretized samples at the Nyquist rate or better). Awards having a one-year project period are anticipated. All responsible sources capable of satisfying the government's needs may submit proposals, which are due 30 August 2005. More information is available at: http://www2.eps.gov/spg/ODA/DARPA/CMO/BAA05%2D35/listing.html

 

DARPA is soliciting proposals for Integrated Learning program. This program seeks to develop computer software that learns general plans or processes from human users by being shown one example. All responsible sources capable of satisfying the government's needs may submit proposals, which are due 14 September 2005, for the initial evaluation phase. More information is available at: http://www2.eps.gov/spg/ODA/DARPA/CMO/BAA05%2D43/listing.html

 

The Department of the Air Force is soliciting white papers proposing research in Measurement and Signatures Intelligence Technology Development. Significant advances are sought in six technology areas: (1) electro-optical, (2) radar, (3) nuclear, (4) materials, (5) radio frequency and (6) geophysical. Approximately $49.9 million over fiscal years 2005-10 is expected to be available for awards having a project period of up to three years. Eligibility is unrestricted. White papers are due 1 August 2005. More information is available at: http://www2.eps.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLRRS/
Reference%2DNumber%2DBAA%2D05%2D09%2DIFKA/listing.html

 

The Air Force is soliciting proposals for development in two areas: (1) advanced chemical sources of singlet delta oxygen with reuseable fuels and (2) an ultra-high bandwidth free space optics link between Mees Solar Observatory (Haleakala, Maui) and NASA IRTF (Mauna Kea, Island of Hawaii). Approximately $1.6 million is expected to be available for two awards having a project period of one year. Eligibility is unrestricted. Proposals are due 29 August 2005. More information is available at: http://www2.eps.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLPLDED/Reference%2DNumber%2DBAA%2D05%2DDE%2D03/listing.html

 

The Air Force is seeking sources to perform detailed design, implementation and integration tasks, in support of a current design concept, for an outside agency. Anticipated deliverables include a ground-based antenna and accompanying articles. The technologies or technology applications will be considered for system development efforts beginning in FY 2006, with an approximated three-year delivery schedule. Responses are highly encouraged by those service providers with mature planar phased array antenna manufacturing technologies and digital beam forming network implementation. More information is available at: http://www2.eps.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/ESC/FA8718%2D05%2DR%2D0001/listing.html

 

The Air Force is seeking small business sources to provide engineering and technical support for its Information and Intelligence Exploitation Division. This division is responsible for developing the techniques, applications and systems required to process imagery, electronic and textual data into substantive intelligence. Anticipated deliverables include computer software development and technical documentation. One contract award of up to $49.9 million is anticipated. A full solicitation is expected to be released by the end of the fourth quarter of FY 2005. More information is available at: http://www2.eps.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLRRS/FA8750%2D05%2DR%2D0247/listing.html

 

The Department of the Army is seeking sources to provide research, development and production of warheads. Requirements include documentation, technology studies and system integration, in addition to warheads R&D and production. No awards are anticipated for responses, which are due within 30 days of this solicitation's publication date (11 July). More information is available at: http://www2.eps.gov/spg/USA/USAMC/DAAE30/W15QKN%2D05%2DX%2D0226/listing.html

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) is soliciting white papers for a remote controlled arm that can be controlled and manipulated to move with snake-like properties. The robotic arm must be capable of completing multiple 90 degree bends on a 360 degree axis along its length. Responses are due 17 August 2005. More information is available at: http://www1.eps.gov/spg/ODA/DTRA/DTRA01/Reference%2DNumber%2DCSE059978339/listing.html

The Air Force is soliciting proposals for funding under the Manned Surrogate Air Vehicle Flight Test Program. This program seeks to enable flight testing of advanced flight control and guidance algorithms, positioning systems, sensors, flow control techniques and aircraft composite structures. Approximately $9.9 million over fiscal years 2005-09 is expected to be available for three awards. Eligibility is unrestricted. Proposals are due 22 August 2005. More information is available at: http://www1.eps.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLWRS/BAA%2DPKV%2D05%2D06/listing.html

The Air Force is seeking quantitative information to determine the feasibility of a Manufacturing Technology, Manufacturing Engineering and Manufacturing Quality Assurance organizational concept that will provide critically needed manufacturing technical skills for the Air Force Industrial Preparedness Program. All responsible sources may submit responses, which are due 15 August 2005. More information is available at: http://www1.eps.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLWRS/
Reference%2DNumber%2DRFI%2D05%2D13%2DPKM/listing.html

The National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) is soliciting R&D proposals for the Director's Innovation Initiative Program. This program, in part, seeks to improve the nation's satellite reconnaissance capabilities. Awards of up to $400,000 for a base period of nine months are anticipated. Eligible are private industry and educational institutions. Registration to submit proposals is open until 30 August 2005; proposals are due 31 August 2005. More information is available at: http://dii.westfields.net/

  • DEPARTMENT OF STATE

The Department of State is soliciting proposals for competitive grants to support development visits by U.S. junior scientists to Egypt and junior Egyptian scientists to the U.S. Special consideration will be given to proposals in the areas of biotechnology, standards and metrology, environmental technologies, energy, manufacturing technologies and information technology. Applicants must be scientists who have received their doctoral degree within the past 10 years or, for U.S. applicants only, are currently enrolled in a Master's or Ph.D. program. Proposals are due 11 October 2005. More information is available at: http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/01jan20051800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2005/05-13649.htm

The State Department also is soliciting proposals for competitive grants to support international, collaborative projects in science and technology between U.S. and Egyptian cooperators. Projects should seek to help the U.S. and Egypt utilize science and technology by providing opportunities to exchange ideas, information, skills, and techniques, and to collaborate on scientific and technological endeavors of mutual interest and benefit. Priority areas include information technology, environmental technologies, biotechnology, energy, standards and metrology, and manufacturing technologies. Proposals are due 3 October 2005. More information is available at: http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/01jan20051800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2005/05-13653.htm

  • DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ED will be soliciting proposals for five-year contract awards to support 10 Regional Educational Laboratories. These laboratories are intended to carry out applied research, development, dissemination, and technical assistance activities to serve the needs of each region of the U.S. Eligible applicants include research organizations such as institutions of higher education, partnerships among such entities, or individuals. A full solicitation is expected to be released on 18 July 2005, with proposals due 19 September 2005. More information is available at: http://www1.eps.gov/spg/ED/OCFO/CPO/ED%2D05%2DR%2D0006/listing.html

  • DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

DOE invites applications for funding under the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. This program supports research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the U.S. by addressing key technical issues impacting the expanded use of nuclear energy. Approximately $4 million in FY 2006 funding is expected to be available for 20-35 awards having a project period of up to three years. Eligible are U.S. colleges and universities. Letters of intent are due 8 August 2005; applications are due 23 August 2005. More information is available at: http://www.fedgrants.gov/Applicants/DOE/PAM/HQ/DE-PS07-05ID14713/listing.html

DOE invites applications for funding under the Industrial Technology Program. This program supports high-risk high-reward R&D to reduce energy intensity in U.S. industrial manufacturing and processing by working with industry partners. Approximately $7.6 million over fiscal years 2006-10 is expected to be available for 2-5 awards having a project period of up to four years. Cost-sharing of at least 30 percent is required. Eligibility is restricted to multiple-organization teams; the primary applicant can be any for-profit or nonprofit organization, state or local government, Indian tribe, or institution of higher education. Letters of intent are due 31 August 2005; applications are due 17 October 2005. More information is available at: http://www.fedgrants.gov/Applicants/DOE/PAM/HQ/DE-PS36-05GO95011/listing.html

  • DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

The Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency invites small business firms to submit proposals for a second round of FY 2005 funding under the Small Business Innovation Research Program. Research is sought in seven topic areas: (1) handheld biological detection system, (2) uncooperative vehicle stopping using non-lethal methods, (3) distributed buoy vessel detection system, (4) hardware-assisted system security monitor, (5) methods to determine structural stability, (6) portable/transportable directional gamma ray, and (7) directional neutron detectors. Awards will not exceed $100,000 for a period of six months or less. Proposals may be submitted between 29 July and 29 August of 2005. More information is available at: http://www.hsarpasbir.com/SolicitationDownload.asp

The Transportation Security Administration is soliciting white papers for the Transportation Security R&D Program. This program seeks to develop technologies and systems that possess capabilities for automatic detection of threats, fusion of data from multiple sensors, smart security decision making capabilities, and transformational concepts. In general, colleges and universities and nonprofit organizations are eligible to submit applications; for-profit organizations and governmental entities may qualify to perform research in aviation security. More information is available at: http://www1.eps.gov/spg/DHS-BT/TSA/HQTSA/HSTS04%2D05%2DR%2DRED028/listing.html

  • NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

NSF is soliciting proposals for funding under the Enhancing the Mathematical Sciences Workforce in the 21st Century program. This program seeks to increase the number of U.S. citizens, nationals and permanent residents who are well prepared in the mathematical sciences and who pursue careers in the mathematical sciences and in other NSF-supported disciplines. Approximately $20.5 million in FY 2006 and annually thereafter is expected to be available for 9-15 awards. The categories of proposers identified in the Grant Proposal Guide are eligible to submit proposals, which are due 12 October 2005. More information is available at: http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf05595

  • FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR UNDERGRADUATES

Central Intelligence Agency, The Undergraduate Scholarship Program: http://www.grantsnet.org/search/pgm_info.cfm?pgm_id=3577 Deadline: 1 November 2005

 

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Merck/AAAS Undergraduate Science Research Program: http://www.grantsnet.org/search/pgm_info.cfm?pgm_id=1810 Deadline: 4 November 2005

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Educational Foundation ROTC Scholarship (AFCEA): http://www.grantsnet.org/search/pgm_info.cfm?pgm_id=3279 Deadline: 1 April 2006

 


6) CONFERENCES, FELLOWSHIPS, PROGRAMS & INTERNSHIPS FOR ENGINEERS, and STUDENTS and SCHOLARS OF ENGINEERING

An engineer once changed careers to serve as Calvin Coolidge's Vice President. As vice president, Charles Dawes influenced the public policy process and won a Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. Dawes might be an extreme example, but that doesn't mean engineers can't influence the public policy process in other ways.  If you don't want to run for office but would like to take a year off from your regular job, IEEE-USA is now accepting applications for the 2007 government fellowship program that links engineers with government.  Our 2005 fellows are working on issues such as homeland security and R&D funding. For more information on what past fellows have learned and experienced, see http://ieeeusa.com/policy/govfel/cfalumni.html.  The deadline is 20 February 2006 and application materials are available at: http://ieeeusa.com/policy/govfel/index.html


7) US STATES WATCH

  • TEXAS PUTTING YET MORE MONEY INTO SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY and IEEE-USA NOMINATION TO NEW EMERGING TECH COMMITTEE

 

23 JULY: Texas Governor Rick Perry announced that Texas will provide a $50 million grant to establish the Texas Institute for Genomic Medicine (TIGM).  This comes after the 2005 Texas Legislature established another science/engineering friendly pot of money called the Emerging Technology Fund (See EOW, No. 11, 8 June 2005).  The $50 million for the TIGM will be taken out of an original $295 million appropriated for the governor's discretionary Texas Enterprise Fund, created by the legislature during the 2003 legislative session.

 

The nonprofit TIGM is a collaborative effort between the Texas A&M University System and Lexicon Genetics, a private technology firm located in Woodland, Texas, north of Houston. Lexicon will receive $35 million of the grant to create two copies of its library of 350,000 mouse stem cell lines for use by TIGM to identify new drugs for combating human diseases. One copy of the library will be housed in remodeled facilities at the Texas A&M University System Health Science Center Institute of Biosciences and Technology, and another copy will be located at a new research and commercialization facility to be built at Texas A&M in College Station. When complete, the new library is expected to be the world's largest collection of mouse embryonic stem cells that have been engineered for the study of gene function, allowing researchers to identify those genes that offer the most promise for future drug development.

 

The new institute is expected to create 5,000 new jobs over the next decade with an average salary of $60,000, according to a press statement. One-third of the jobs will be created directly at Lexicon, reports a 17 July Houston Chronicle article, while the balance is to be spun out of university research supported by the grant. More information is available at: http://www.tamhsc.edu/news/archives/001914.php

 

As we've told you earlier, IEEE-USA was working on a nomination to fill one of the slots on the Committee that will run the new Emerging Technology Fund.  We are happy to report that in late June, we sent a letter to Governor Perry nominating IEEE Senior Member and Austin resident, Sherry J. Gillespie, to fill one of the 17 positions of the Emerging Technology Committee. Gillespie is currently a Technology Management Consultant. She previously worked as a director at Motorola's Semiconductor Product Sector in Austin, and as a manager at IBM Microelectronics. She has served in industry-wide roles on the Board of Directors of the Semiconductor Research Corp., as a member of the Technology Strategy Committee of the Semiconductor Industry Association; on a panel for the U.S. Dept. of Defense on the impact of the future of Moore's Law, on the Review Panel in Microelectronics and Telecommunications for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and as Industrial Advisor for the NSF Science and Technology Center for Synthesis, Growth and Analysis of Electronic Materials at the University of Texas.

 


8) LATEST IEEE-USA ACTIVITIES

  • NEW RESOURCE PAGE ON EHealth

Major E-Health goals for improving the health care system in the U.S. are improving patient safety, improving the interoperability of health information systems, and improving the capability for exchanging patient information while increasing the effectiveness and containing costs. Other critical goals include protecting the privacy of personally-identifiable health records and preventing discrimination based on genetic information.

IEEE-USA also supports policies aiding the transition from our current state of disconnected health information systems to a National Health Information Network (NHIN) that will make use of leading-edge networking technologies, such as web services, mobile communications, and multimedia communications to provide secure and reliable transport of healthcare information. Please visit the IEEE-USA EHealth Resource page, highlighting positions and policy communications, at http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/issues/EHealth/index.html

  • NEW! TRACK IEEE-USA's PROGRESS

Review IEEE-USA's year-to-date progress in working for the IEEE's U.S. members at the new IEEE-USA Year-in-Review Web page. Check out what IEEE-USA activities and programs helped the IEEE's U.S. members in 2004 at the new IEEE-USA Annual Report online. And find out what's on IEEE-USA's agenda through 2009, with the new, online IEEE-USA Strategic & Operational Plan.

 

For the IEEE-USA Year-in-Review, go to:

http://www.ieeeusa.org/about/yearinreview.asp

 

For the IEEE-USA Annual Report, go to:

http://www.ieeeusa.org/about/Annual_Report/2004.pdf

 

For the IEEE-USA Strategic & Operational Plan, go to:

http://www.ieeeusa.org/volunteers/strategicplan/index.html

Also, full listing of IEEE-USA lobbying activities can be found on our web site at: http://ieeeusa.com/policy/policy/index.html

  • IEEE-USA & IEEE COMPUTER SOCIETY SPONSOR FORUM ON CYBERSECURITY

 

26 JULY: If you weren't already afraid to do your banking on-line, you would be after listening to 2 speakers, both former PITAC members, who briefed congressional staffers on the need for increased cyber security. In conjunction with the Congressional Research and Development Caucus, IEEE-USA and the IEEE Computer Society Task Force on Information Assurance (TFIA) held a forum on Capitol Hill to discuss the recommendations of  Cyber security. A Crisis of Prioritization — A Report by the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC).

The "bad guys" — as Dr. Tom Leighton, Chief Scientist, Akamai Technologies and Professor of Applied Mathematics, MIT referred to those who will steal your banking information — have become very good at "phishing" and "pharming." You may think you're on a legitimate web site, safely entering your social security number.  In reality, the "bad guy" has "grabbed" you before your bank could, and now your identity has been stolen.


Dr. Eugene Spafford, Professor of Computer Sciences and a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University, and the Executive Director of the Purdue CERIAS (Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security) reiterated the need for federal involvement.  We shouldn't have to wait for the next catastrophic event to motivate changes in public policy.

Audience members rightly asked, "Who's listening?" to the calls for much needed R&D into increasing the security of the U.S. IT infrastructure. Drs. Leighton and Spafford hope that Congress is. As holders of the nation's purse strings, that's where the responsibility lays.

Dr. Eugene Spafford

Dr. Tom Leighton (center) with, from left, IEEE-USA Committee on Communications Policy (CCP) Chair Bob Powers, Dr. Spafford, IEEE-USA staffer Debbie Rudolph and Congresswoman Judy Biggert

Congresswoman Judy Biggert (R-Ill.), Chair of the Subcommittee on Energy, House Science Committee who delivered opening remarks, with IEEE-USA staff, Debbie Rudolph
  • 2005 IEEE-USA WISE INTERNS

L to R: Matt Ezovski, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Gerry Alphonse, IEEE-USA President; Patrick Stokes, University of Texas-Austin; and Elizabeth Johnston, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, photographed in the DC offices of IEEE-USA


9) OTHER ITEMS OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

  • INDIAN PRIME MINISTER SPEAKS TO CONGRESS: EXCERPTS FROM AN ONLINE REPORT

22 JULY:  Indian Express Web, A Scholar goes to the US Congress — In many ways the visit of Dr Manmohan Singh to Washington DC has put a gentle, scholarly face to India's aspirations and governance. It gave him an opportunity to categorically tell the world that India thought the Iraq war was simply wrong. Saying that to the hosts follows the emerging tradition of going beyond homilies and saying what needs to be said while maintaining the relationships the leaders develop behind the camera. Not long ago we had George Bush chastising Putin and then claiming they were friends and he could share his thoughts freely.

Watching Manmohan Singh at the Joint session of the US Congress and Senate and the National Press Club it is clear that we have a PM who is easily appreciated for his sincerity, scholarship and humility... his unassuming demeanour wins both him and India some friends in unusual places... he delivered minus any ambiguity the message of a strong and decisive India that preferred democratic ways of dealing with the world.

Talking to a few Congressmen after his speech left me with the distinct impression that they had heard his message clearly and had begun to appreciate the Indian viewpoint better. His plea for a global role for India has been taken seriously by his hosts, but this does not mean they are ready to support India's claim to a permanent seat in the UN Security Council anytime soon. The largest democracy, yes; but India is still not strategic to the US in a way that it will automatically win a seat at the table. The 10th largest economy is still the 10th economy, not the sixth or the seventh. In his concluding interaction with the US media therefore, Manmohan Singh emphasised economics and energy, and suggested that if India continues to grow, the rest of the world will have no choice but to take notice. But if it falters, it will have its downside as well.

...Interestingly, he did not talk about information technology, save when answering some questions wherein he argued for investments in hardware rather than software. On outsourcing, he was categorical that both American and Indian companies benefit, and so it should continue. But he gave no vision of an India where information technologies that have made India an important member of the global market will be the main plank of development. In his speech at the Press Club he used the phrase ‘information technology' only once. In other words, it is not yet strategic to his mind, and the more significant issues for him are economic growth and energy security.

SATISH JHA (Posted online: Friday, July 22, 2005) The writer is a management consultant. http://www.aiti-kace.com.gh; www.dpindia.org; http://www.witfor.org

 
[press release] [executive summary] [full report]


This report by the Corporate Research Project of Good Jobs First spotlights the growing degree to which state governments are awarding contracts to offshore outsourcing firms. It was produced for the Washington Alliance of Technology Workers (WashTech), a local union of the Communications Workers of America that supports workers in the information technology sector. The report found that 18 offshore outsourcing firms — including several billion-dollar companies from India — are aggressively seeking state government contract work, primarily in information technology, in at least 30 states. The 18 firms have already captured at least $75 million in offshore state contracts and are seeking more, in part by hiring former government officials and by making state electoral campaign contributions. The study also looks at the large number of state food-stamp call centers that are operated offshore.  (Taken from http://www.goodjobsfirst.org/)

 


Top of Page | What's New@IEEE | EyeOnWash Archive | IEEE-USA


What's New @ IEEE-USA's Eye on Washington highlights important federal legislative and regulatory developments that affect U.S. engineers and their careers. In addition to this biweekly newsletter, subscribers receive legislative bulletins and action alerts on IEEE-USA priority issues, including: retirement security, employment benefits, research & development funding, computers and information policy, immigration reform, intellectual property protection and privacy of health/medical information.

EDITOR: Erica Wissolik, IEEE-USA, 2001 L Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036-5104

You can change your IEEE-USA Eye on Washington subscription status by using the forms at http://whatsnew.ieee.org/ or at http://www.ieeeusa.org/emailupdates/.

Copyright © 2005, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.  Permission granted to copy for personal use or for non-commercial republication with appropriate attribution.

Updated: 27 July 2005
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