IEEE.org  |  IEEE Xplore Digital Library  |  IEEE Standards  |  IEEE Spectrum  |  More Sites IEEE
 

IEEE-USA Home: Career Navigator

Career Webinars

 

Patentability and Infringement: A Practical Guide for Understanding the Basics
Presenter: Karen Dana Oster
Recorded:
9 November 2010
View a recording of this webinar
Download: slides

Overview:

Despite their similarities, patentability (can you get a patent for your invention?) and infringement (will there be a liability if you practice your invention?) are very different issues and must be considered separately.

  • An invention may not infringe a patent, and be patentable over the patent.
  • An invention may infringe a patent, and still be patentable over the patent.
  • An invention may infringe a patent, and not be patentable over the patent.
  • An invention may not infringe a patent, and still not be patentable over the patent.

If you have an idea for a product or service, you need to understand at least the basics of this confusing topic. This presentation will include practical tips that you can do yourself without consulting an attorney. It will also direct your attention to situations in which an attorney should be consulted.

Presenter Biography:

Karen Oster has been assisting businesses and individuals turn their ideas into patents for almost 20 years. She has written and/or prosecuted patents in almost every technological category.

Oster has a bachelor of arts degree in English from the University of California at Santa Barbara; a juris doctorate from Loyola Law School, and a bachelor of science in computer engineering from California State University in Long Beach. Her computer engineering degree was directed to a combination of software, digital electronics and analog electronics. For six years, Oster wrote bi-annual updates for the Federal Circuit Patent Case Digests published by West Group. Karen also wrote the "Patents and E-Commerce" chapter of the Oregon State Bar Computer and Internet Law Section e-Commerce Deskbook.
For more than 15 years, Karen has served on the executive committee of the Oregon State Bar Intellectual Property Section, the Oregon State Bar Computer and Internet Law Section, and/or the Oregon Patent Law Association, and often served as an officer for these committees. Oster is a longtime IEEE member and currently serves on IEEE-USA's Intellectual Property Committee.

 << back

Updated:  16 November 2010
Contact: Helen Hall, h.hall@ieee.org

 

 Copyright 2016 IEEE

Terms & Conditions - Privacy and Security - Nondiscrimination Policy - Contacts/Info